Captain Hook

Last weekend, while perusing through numerous magazines from past week’s loot, I found inspiration to learn the art of crocheting. The thought lingered over the week as I could not find my one and only hook from years ago, until I got sick where I had to stay home to recover. I searched every nook and cranny of my art shelves and finally found it tucked in my sewing kit all along. It was right under my nose all this time!

My obsessed self quickly picked up that hook and made a crochet kit by looking for all the strings I had collected years ago. In a matter of 3 days, while recovering from sickness that involved meds that caused my tummy to tumble, I learned 11 patterns. There are so many videos available online that the opportunities on crocheting feels endless! I have an ultimate goal but I will only share it once I have completed it. For the meantime, I will practice basic crochet patterns to gain some experience before I venture in to starting my goal.

I will be sharing the patterns I created over the weekend. I made notes on a notebook to help me refresh my memory if I decide to take a break for a while. Mind you, though these swatches look tiny, each took about 5-10 mins to grasp the technique and another 20-40 mins to execute.

Single Crochet – After doing so many patterns, I learned that doing an extra chain stitch to serve as a turning stitch is critical to start every layer to ensure the edges remain straight. Clearly, I kept missing one chain each time causing the edges to narrow.batch_sam_2099

Half Double, Double, Triple Crochet – After watching numerous videos, I learned that US uses single, half double, double, and triple as stitch terminologies while UK uses double (US – single), half treble (US – half double) and treble (US – double).batch_sam_2103

Granny Square – This was quite therapeutic! Clearly, I made too many layers for a swatch.batch_sam_2090

Waffle Stitch – I chose to practice this stitch because the name of the pattern made me hungry. Thankfully, I decided to try it because the pattern is beautiful! I can just imagine how nice this texture will be using yarn for scarves or blankets!batch_sam_2095

Sunburst Granny Square – This was one of my favorite patterns but it was quite tedious to make because of the different techniques and changes in color for each layer.batch_sam_2088

Sample Coaster Pattern – I love the coral edges it brought. This was when I started to learn that following the count of the pattern is very important to achieve the intended effect especially on edges.batch_sam_2092

Flat Circle – The right exponential increase must be captured to ensure the circle remains flat.batch_sam_2094

Solid Granny Squarebatch_sam_2098

Arcade Stitch – This required precise measurements that needed to be followed all the way.batch_sam_2100

Chevron – I didn’t enjoy this that much. It was quite difficult to follow the count. There were so many different versions online that made the principles difficult to lock. I will look for more videos that will make this pattern more intuitive to create.batch_sam_2106

Hexagon Pattern – This was a fun and easy pattern. I want to try combining different hexagons next time.batch_sam_2102

© 2016 Dolce Vita. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. (marieltan.wordpress.com)

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About Mariel Tan

Artist at heart who shares the spice in her life. Visit my blogs: https://marieltan.wordpress.com/ https://joiedevivremariel.wordpress.com/

7 comments

  1. Stunning work. My mom used to crochet, both wool and cotton thread, and I have drawers full of her projects. I have kept the afghans and shawls as well as the doilies and runners because so few people appreciate that kind of workmanship any more. I learned from her but my only big project was a beautiful lacy table cloth.

    Here’s a picture of the tablecloth my MOM made. (Please excuse the food.) Maybe I’ll use mine this year.

    http://a-boleyn.livejournal.com/2012/12/25/

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s amazing!! I think I need to practice making doilies first before I venture into making massive tablecloth. I wonder how long that will take with such fine thread.
      And yes, use yours this year and document it!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • The table-cloth I made was a BIG project. It consisted of squares/blocks which each took me about 1 hr to complete. I think it was 14 x18 squares in size so that would have been over 250 hrs. Will check later.

        I stuck to cross-stitch, some soft doll sculpture and a quilt that has yet to be quilted though the top has been done for 20 yrs. 🙂

        http://a-boleyn.livejournal.com/162253.html

        http://a-boleyn.livejournal.com/76992.html

        And, of course, I cook.

        My mom knitted, crocheted, did macrame and was an amazing cook. Simple dishes, mostly the meat and potatoes of a farm woman born and raised in the former Yugoslavia of Romanian descent. Though she made strudel from scratch and crepes and cream puffs. Fancy fare for a woman who never went to school past the primary grades.

        Liked by 1 person

        • I tried my luck at doing a doily over the weekend and it took me 10 hours! I will post about it soon. With more practice, I hope to be as fast as you guys when crocheting.

          Your mom sounds very industrious!! Makes me inspired to create new things – both crafts and food.

          Post more great creations!!

          Liked by 1 person

          • Congratulations on the doily. For some people, crocheting is therapeutic, for others it’s a great way to use their free time to make gifts for friends or family. My mom could never sit still without something to do especially in the winter months when she couldn’t putter around in the garden. I’d love to share pictures of some of her projects even though I couldn’t reproduce them myself no give any info on how they were made. 🙂

            I’d love to share some pictures of my mom’s work

            Liked by 1 person

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